Land Management

Some of the best places for nature in Sussex are the Sussex Wildlife Trust’s nature reserves. Sitting at the heart of iconic landscapes, they are also key to the future of nature in Sussex: not only do they inspire and re-connect people to nature but they also support important populations of some of our rarest wildlife. These are the places from which nature will be able to recover.

The Sussex Wildlife Trust’s nature reserves encompass large areas of land across the whole of Sussex and include saltmarsh, shingle beaches, chalk cliffs, Downland, heathland, meadows, woodland, sandstone rock outcrops plus river valleys, wetland and grazing marsh.

These rich and diverse places are managed by staff from the Sussex Wildlife Trust with the support of its many volunteers. On many sites, the Trust also grazes with its own cattle, sheep and ponies, ensuring that each site is maintained in optimum condition.

In this section

Coastal

A place for Bitterns, Sea Pea, Glasswort and the Potter Flower-bee

Downland

A place for Round-headed Rampion - the pride of Sussex, Burnt Orchids and the Phantom Hoverfly

Heathland

A place for Heath Tiger beetles, the Bee-wolf and the Minotaur beetle

Meadow and unimproved grassland

A place for Devil’s-bit Scabious, Adders Tongue Fern and the Chimney Sweeper Moth

Wetland

A place for the Reed Dagger Moth, Water Rail and the Water Ladybird

Woodland

A place for Wild Daffodils, Barbastelle Bats and Wild-service trees

Dogs on nature reserves

What does it mean to own a dog and enjoy the countryside? It can mean lots of fresh air, great views, and fantastic wildlife watching opportunities but also responsibility.

Drones on nature reserves

Sussex Wildlife Trust does not allow visitors to fly drones over its nature reserves.

Grazing

We use conservation grazing as a tool to manage nature reserves in the most natural way possible

Caring for the countryside

We want you to enjoy your visit to a Sussex Wildlife Trust nature reserve and help to keep these sites special places. You can do this by following the Countryside Code.