Archive of: Reptiles

  • Here be dragons

    Here be dragons

    If you know where to look, there are still plenty of dragons to be found in Sussex today. Granted, they are miniature dragons at just 15 cm from nose to tail but the Common Lizard is no less fearsome to its insect prey.

  • Dancing Adders

    Dancing Adders

    Courting Adders move in a synchronised flowing behaviour, with much tongue-flicking and tail-lashing. After mating, the male stays to guard his female and will dance with intruding males, rearing up and entwining bodies to wrestle his rival to the ground.

  • The Great British Snake Off

    The Great British Snake Off

    Snakes are often thought of as exotic creatures to be admired (or avoided) on holidays in hotter countries, but Britain is home to three native species of snake.

  • Species of the day: Slow-worm

    Species of the day: Slow-worm

    Both the naming and look of the Slow-worm may be confusing, for it’s neither a worm nor particularly slow in its movements; nor is it a snake - as per its superficial look.

  • Species of the day: Common Lizard

    Species of the day: Common Lizard

    The Common or Viviparous Lizard is one of just three native Lizard species. Along with the leg-less Slow-Worm it’s the other you’re most likely to see

  • The Common Lizard

    The Common Lizard

    If you know where to look, there are still plenty of ‘dragons’ to be found in Sussex today…

  • Slow worm

    Slow worm

    The slow worm’s name is a bit deceptive, since it is neither slow nor a worm.

  • Legless

    Author Ronnie ReedSchools Officer grass snake in pond / Alan GreyI hate to admit it but I have a strong aversion to things that slither and slide. Ever since I was child
  • 26.04.14 Snakes and Lizards at South Malling

    As part of the DownTown Lewes project we're holding a number of events over the next few months celebrating the wildlife that can be found around the town.Today reptile expert Barry Kemp of the Sussex Amphibian and Reptile Group (SARG) gave a talk about snakes, lizards, frogs, toads and newts
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