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Bird Song: Dunnock

26 March 2014 | Posted in , Birds ,

Author Neil Fletcher

Interpretation Officer

dunnock / Neil Fletcher dunnock / Neil Fletcher

Dunnocks are charming little birds, skulking about in the dark places beneath bushes, rarely more than two metres above the ground. But in the spring they're a bit more showy, singing and chirping away on top of a hedge, flicking their wings and hopping about. Sometimes there are three or four together, an indication of their fabulously promiscuous lifestyle. Females may entertain two or three males at the same time, which reluctantly tolerate each other and all chip in to help with the chicks, since chicks within a brood may have different fathers, though equally they may nip off to visit other female friends. Whatever works for them.

Listen to the dunnocks song

[audio mp3="http://www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/dunnock.mp3"][/audio]

The song is a rather tuneless jumble of high notes lasting about three seconds, sometimes confused with a wren, but without the rapidly repeated notes or trills of the smaller bird, and not nearly so loud or strong.

sonogram of dunnock's song sonogram of dunnock's song

More bird song here

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