Archive of: October, 2019

  • Welcoming our first wheelchair user to the Discovery Centre

    Welcoming our first wheelchair user to the Discovery Centre

    ‘I am so pleased to see that this new Discovery Centre not only enjoys picture window views over the ever-changing scenery of Rye Harbour, but its planners have been kind enough to make it fully accessible. For wheelchair users like me, and for families with prams, this makes a huge difference. Thank you!’

  • Eight legs good? Jumping Spiders

    Eight legs good? Jumping Spiders

    Jumping spiders may seem like a terrifying prospect but they are among the tiniest of our 650 native spider species - and arguably the cutest.

  • Tawny Owls become territorial

    Tawny Owls become territorial

    Tawny Owls spent the summer months doting on their youngsters, devoting every waking minute to child care. They have been perfect parents, hunting, feeding and watching over their growing brood as they gradually transformed from fluffy little owlets into fully fledged adults. But now, with the turning of the seasons comes a sudden change in tawny owl temperament from tolerant to territorial.

  • One Man and his Dog

    One Man and his Dog

    The Land Management Team at Sussex Wildlife Trust has been pleased to welcome a number of new faces in recent months, some more furry than others! New Grazing Manager Tom Parry brings Border Collie Reg to work with him each day as the young dog starts his training to become a fully-fledged sheepdog working with the Trust’s flock of 500 Herdwick and Hebridean sheep.

  • How do you tell the difference between a Stoat and a Weasel?

    How do you tell the difference between a Stoat and a Weasel?

    Most people are surprised by just how small Weasels are. They’re built on the same diminutive scale as their small mammal prey, and they’re officially Britain’s smallest carnivore. Legend has it that a Weasel can slip its head through a wedding ring, so they are easily capable of nipping into a mouse-sized burrow in pursuit of a hot meal. What they lack in size, they more than make up for in attitude.

  • Jay - the flashiest dresser of the corvid family

    Jay - the flashiest dresser of the corvid family

    The ‘black sheep’ of the corvid family is the Jay. Black and white both feature in its plumage but this colourful character has well and truly flaunted the Corvid dress code, and in the most rebellious fashion: by wearing pink.

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